MVP #036 – Phased Training Breaking Plateaus and Half Marathon Race Results – Mark Phipps – Mocha Vegan Performance Podcast

Posted: 2014-11-06 in family, focus, good choices, habits, intensity, performance, podcast, productivity, responsibility, running, tracking
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Training in Phases

Cleveland Marathon

Training in Phases

Increased Load

Similar to training for your first 5K race, many marathoner trainers simply increase their load over time so that they reach a maximum distance in time for their race. By running several times during the week and having one ‘long’ run on the weekend, you see your long run distance slowly approach marathon distance.

3-Week Phases

Other thoughts include taking two steps forward and one step back where your mileage increases two weeks in a row, then steps back slightly on the third week. This works well at the beginning, when gains in duration and distance are at their maximum. However, this approach can be tedious over the many months of marathon preparation AND it does not provide large enough improvements in pace for me.

Speed Training

Improving your performance with speed training involves testing your limits. In order to go fast, you have to … go faster. It isn’t quite that simple, I agree. To run a faster marathon, you must run a faster half marathon. To run the faster half marathon, you must run a faster 10K. A faster 10K requires a faster 5K, 2 miler, 1 miler or lap around your high school track. You have to go to the shortest distance necessary to see improvements. Do these shorter, faster, intervals with appropriate breaks between and you will be on your way to that faster Boston Marathon Qualifier. Run, Forrest, Run.

Creating More Time

Blerk

Set your alarm, get up early, do good things

Habits – Making the most of the time that you have.

You are convinced that there is a lot of productive time left on the table each day. It seems like you just work, go to bed and repeat. What happens to those few elusive hours surrounding the work and sleep each day? It will require some tracking, a little analysis, to really figure things out.

This won’t take long. Get a note card or a small notebook and keep it with you. For one week (so you cover all the days and their different structures. Identify each element of your day that seems to be a time-waster or unproductive. WRITE IT DOWN. For example, “2o minutes have Facebook chat with my buddy” OR “30 minutes catching up on ____ (Facebook, Twitter, news websites, etc.”

Do this for a week. Be honest, if you watch four episodes of your favorite show with the family, great, but right it down. Most successful people watch an hour or less of television each day and focus their social media time. Identify your 3-hour-per-day TV habit or your propensity to chat on the phone for an innocent 30 minutes several times each day and you are on your way to a more productive self.

Turn that Frown Upside-Down

So you’ve made THE LIST of your time transgressions and can’t even set it down for fear that someone will read it and judge you. Let’s take that list and invert it. Take each poor habit and transition it into the opposite: For example: “Watched more than 2 hours of TV every day” BECOMES “Watch less than 90 minutes of TV each day”. Take each habit and describe what you think is a healthier version of that habit. Do it for everything.

 

The goal is not to change everything overnight. What you should strive for is performing one of these new, RICH, habits and celebrating your success. Make a note of your successes. Each positive habit served during your day or week will allow other desired activities into your schedule. Perhaps the garden you always wanted to plant, reading some inspirational material or a more regular exercise regimen. You get the idea?

Get out there and try it. Keep score for a week and create healthier versions of those habit as daily time-saving goals.

Good luck!

Until next time:

Mark
@mochavegan
mark@mochavegan.com

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